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Tuesday, April 13, 2010

A beautifully kept British village!

Hi everyone,
I have just arrived back from 5 days in Rutland, which is an amazingly beautiful county. We were staying at my son and daughter-in-laws house, while they are away. It gave tony a change of scenery, as he still can't do much but rest. 
The following image is of me, for once being allowed to drive the Pocket Rocket, as Tony was feeling too tired!Ha!!
On our last trip to Rutland, the sign in the following image caught our eye. We were not sure, that we had read it correctly, so we decided to go slowly this time and catch it on camera. We were right the first time!! "I suppose truck drivers have to rest some times", was my husband's reply!!!
Living in London, l have got used to transport of one sort or another that runs 24 hrs a day. Where my son lives,  the bus is a couple of times a day and not on Sundays and stop in the early evening! You need a car! Actually it reminds me of when l lived with my parents on various RAF camps all over the UK. We normally had a bus once or twice a week, normally on Market Day! The image below is of the local bus, on one of its rounds of the villages, on its way to Oakham.
My son and daughter-in-laws village is beautiful and doesn't have a garden out of place. This sign is seen in quite a few gardens, in his village of thatched cottages!
The next image made me giggle. I heard this strange noise out side the house and went to see what it was. I had been joking only a few minutes before, to Tony, that l would not be surprized if the Estsate staff didn't roll the roads flat. Then around the corner came these two guys, with a grass roller that u normally use on a cricket pitch say, to flatten certain parts of the grass area ! It looked as if they were actually rolling the tarmac flat! I should explain, the village is in the Estate of Exton. I will write some more about the estate tomorrow.


One other thing that made me smile, while walking round this immaculate village was the following image. Normally, you will see a few tissues on the pavement but here in this village you don't get anything as common as a paper tissue. Oh no! You get a cotton, embroidered, lace edged handkercheif! Ha Beautifully British.

While l was walking round the village, l also noticed, that there were quite a few unusal door frames in the village, so l have posted a few here. The first one has a stone lintel over the wooden door.
The next door , has an unusual 3 glass panel in it with a wooden over-hang, with a tiled slope on it.

The next image has an unusual blue awning like cover over it. It also appears to be nail down, like when you attach leather to a wooden chair base, with brass studs.
The last of these door images, is more to do with the sign, rather than the covering over the entrance.  I love the word Druggist, much more expressive than The Chemists, which is what it would be called now, l am guessing! The house is no longer a Druggist shop but has reverted back to being a private dwelling.

The feather below, l found at the entrance to the village. It looked so beautiful with the dew still on it, l just had to take it's image!

The last image is of a garden ornament l saw in one of the village gardens. I don't normally like this sort of thing, mainly becuase they look tacky and not well made but this one is rather cute, l think!


4 comments:

Carolyn Ford said...

It IS a lovely village! And, what wonderful photos you have posted. I love your term, "pocket rocket!" I visited England quite a few years ago, 2 summers in a row...We were mostly in London and the Cotswolds and then spent a little time in Wales. Everything is so green and wonderful in your country. Thank you for visiting me today!

Hey Harriet said...

Ha! That Poop Scoop sign is awesome! And I love those doors. I don't see many interesting doors where I am. It looks like a gorgeous little village!

Dave said...

Thanks for sharing, I must admit that Poop Scoop Area sign is striking.

The Lucy and Dick Show said...

I love the moss on the roof of the overhang! Such history and beauty there.